Oviedo Cathedral

We visit the Oviedo Cathedral — a remarkable place. This was a truly sacred place.

I read from chapter 41 of the Tao te Ching.

“When a superior man hears of the Tao,
he immediately begins to embody it.”

The main alter is the heart. It has with silver scenes from the life of Jesus. I walk to see it.

“When an average man hears of the Tao,
he half believes it, half doubts it.”

What do you know about Jesus?

The Christ child – taken to Egypt.
Center right  – crucifixion. Bottom left — healing (I think)

In the museum are two famous crosses

The victory cross, the symbol of Oviedo, was carryied into battle (against the Moor during a very difficult time) and brought victory.

 

This is the real thing — they fixed it up a bit and put some jewels on it but this is the battle cross.

This cross was brought by angels.

The cross of the angels — It dates back to the 800’s and they found it to be beautiful. The guy who made it disappeared so he must have been an angel.

 

 

 

There is more. They have the shroud that covered Jesus in the tomb.

 

What do you think?

 

There is more — so much. This pot held wine at the wedding in Cana where Jesus turned the water into wine — his first miracle.

 

 

St. James appeared in the sky and led the Christian army against the Moors. The historians say that this did not actually happen — that the battle is actually a myth — but many men during centuries afterward went into battle with this story in their minds and the battle cry “Santiago” on their lips.

More.

This is the way to the toilets.

“When a foolish man hears of the Tao,
he laughs out loud.
If he didn’t laugh,
it wouldn’t be the Tao.”

 

“Thus it is said:
The path into the light seems dark,
the path forward seems to go back,”

 

 

“the direct path seems long,
true power seems weak,
true purity seems tarnished,
true steadfastness seems changeable,”

 

“”true clarity seems obscure,
the greatest are seems unsophisticated,
the greatest love seems indifferent,
the greatest wisdom seems childish.”

 

“The Tao is nowhere to be found.
Yet it nourishes and completes all things.”

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